natural . toxic-free . fast acting . dermatitis treatments

 

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How to heal your hands in just 1 week:

 We recommend using Vegesorb as a skin barrier during the day while you're at work

 

 

 

 

If your skin is particularly dry or cracked we highly recommend using Hope's Relief Hydrating Lotion, at least until your skin repairs itself.

This lotion is full of nutritional, healing goodness for your skin, and you will be amazed with the fast results. This naturopath approved lotion sinks into your skin beautifully and feels amazing!

 

 As a general everyday maintenance we recommend keeping Sukin Hand Cream in your car, bag, and at work. To make it even easier; pop it next to your hand wash, then you won't forget to put it on :-) 

 

♥ We guarantee you will LOVE these products and the results they will give you, or ...... we will give you your money back! ♥ 

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> Contact Dermatitis

Presents itself as a similar rash to atopic eczema. The difference is that contact dermatitis (as the name suggests) is the result of an allergic reaction after coming into contact with, or touching something. This type of eczema can be caused by many irritants including; soaps, detergents, latex, cosmetics, different fabrics, wool, metals, plants, animal hair, feathers, etc. Dermatitis usually affects the hands, because it is the hands that are touching everything while you work. But it can also affect the arms, face or legs, in fact any part of the body. Skin dryness is usually the first sign of dermatitis and often starts in the web spaces between the fingers.

Dermatitis can make the skin:

  • Dry
  • Itchy
  • Red
  • Split and cracked
  • Flake and peel
  • Burn and sting
  • Sometimes there are small blisters

Like eczema, this condition can be very distressing and unsightly, and people often find the appearance of their skin embarrassing. It can interfere with sleeping, especially when it is very itchy. In some circumstances, dermatitis can become so severe that some people have to give up their job or career. However, it can often be managed with good skin care. When dermatitis develops the skin may take months to heal, even once it looks like it has returned to normal.

Dermatitis commonly affects people working in a range of industries, but most often affects those working in:

  • Hairdressing
  • Healthcare
  • Food handling
  • Manufacturing
  • Construction
  • Printing
  • Metal working
  • Automotive industry

 

WHAT IS THE BEST TREATMENT FOR MY DERMATITIS? ......

 

We recommend using Vegesorb as a skin barrier during the day while you're at work

Then use Sukin Hand Cream at night to help to heal and soften your hands while you sleep.  

 

There are 3 main types of Dermatitis:

  • Irritant contact dermatitis
  • Allergic contact dermatitis
  • Contact Urticaria. (latex allergy is a type of contact urticaria)


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> Irritant Contact Dermatitis

Irritant contact dermatitis is the most common type of dermatitis. Usually irritant contact dermatitis builds up over time, after regular exposure to skin irritants. Skin dryness is usually the first sign and often starts in the web spaces between the fingers.

The most common causes of irritant contact dermatitis are:

  • Water and 'wet work' e.g. frequent hand washing, dishwashing, food preparation, patient bathing and repeated shampooing (for hairdressers)
  • Soaps and detergent
  • Heat and sweating
  • Dusts and fibres
  • Chemicals such as solvents and thinners
  • Grease, oils, fuels

The skin may take months to heal, even once it looks like it has returned to normal.

People working in the following industries, especially those jobs which involve lots of 'wet work' and frequent contact with chemicals, are at highest risk. These include:

  • Food handling
  • Hair and beauty
  • Healthcare
  • Mechanical and metal working and
  • Construction


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> Allergic Contact Dermatitis

Allergic contact dermatitis is a delayed type of allergy. Allergy is very individual (i.e. a person may be allergic to something, that another person can use with no problems). It can occur at any time, even if you have been using a product for many years or just a few weeks. With this form of dermatitis, the rash appears 8 to 24 hours after contact and lasts for several days, sometimes more.

If the skin is already damaged, such as being dry and cracked, the risk of becoming allergic to something is much higher. Once an allergy to something has developed, it is lifelong and even the smallest amount of contact will cause the rash to appear again.

Only certain chemicals have the potential to cause allergic reactions. It is said that there are approximately 100,000 chemicals, but only about 4,000 have been reported to cause allergic contact dermatitis. Some very strong substances, such as kerosene, do not cause allergy, but are extremely irritating to the skin.

Whether people develop an allergic reaction depends on:

  • The type of chemical contacted
  • Concentration of chemical on the skin
  • Duration of skin contact
  • Individual tendency to develop allergy

Common causes of allergy are:

  • Hair dye
  • Nickel
  • Chromate which is found in cement and used in tanned leather
  • Rubber chemicals, also called accelerators, which can be found in gloves
  • Glues and coatings such as epoxy resin
  • Preservatives in skin care products
  • Fragrances
  • Some foods such as garlic and onion

'Patch testing' is the diagnostic test used to see if a person is allergic to substances.


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Contact Urticaria

Contact urticaria is a different type of allergy, which can also occur at any time.
The reaction starts immediately following contact with the allergen, usually within 10-30 minutes following skin contact. It normally settles down an hour after contact has stopped, and the reaction is usually caused by a plant or animal product. This condition usually causes welts or hives on the skin, with itchiness and swelling, but can also cause a runny nose, sneezing and asthma-like symptoms. Recurrent episodes of contact urticaria can lead to dermatitis (termed 'protein contact dermatitis'). This may appear just like allergic or irritant contact dermatitis.

Special blood tests and a different form of allergy testing; prick testing, is used to diagnose contact urticaria. Prick testing is commonly used by allergists to diagnose causes of asthma, hayfever and food allergies. Blood tests (radioallergosorbent or RAST) can also be used.

 

 

 

** The information in this website sets forth current opinions from recognized authorities, but it does not dictate an exclusive treatment course. People with questions about a medical condition should consult a physician first, who is knowledgeable about their medical history.